George Zimmerman’s Gym Offers ‘Zimmerman’ Training Package

Published:7:16 pm EDT, July 10, 2013| Updated:7:16 pm EDT, July 10, 2013|
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Adam Pollock, a central Florida gym owner and trainer, addresses the jury while kneeling over defense attorney Mark O'Mara during a demonstration on possible fighting positions, during the George Zimmerman trial on July 8, 2013. (Getty)

Kokopelli Gym, the facility that provided George Zimmerman with his self-defense training, which he presumably used in the altercation with Trayvon Martin, is now offering a program consisting of "the training Zimmerman received."

Questions of the ethicacy of this marketing decision have been put into question.

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Screen shot from the page on the Kokopelli Gym website advertising for "the training George Zimmerman received."

The owner of Kokopelli Gym, Adam Pollock, appeared in court today after being called to testify on behalf of the defense. Pollock testified that from the time Zimmerman joined the gym in 2010, the defendant had lost between 50-80 punds. He also began some boxing training.

"He was an overweight, large man when he came to us. [He was] a very pleasant, very nice man, but physically soft [and] predominantly fat," testified Pollock. "[He did] not [have] a lot of muscle; not a lot of strength."

The public has begun to question Pollock's character after his past crimes have come to light.

Yelp users are also sharing their opinions on Mr. Polluck's business decisions.

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Yelp users share this displeasure with the Kokopelli Gym's marketing practices. (Image courtesy of DailyDot.com)

After the jury left the court room, prosecution attempted to impeach Pollack as a witness. They accuse the witness of having ulterior motive. The prosecution alleges that Pollack was motivated to testify to get free promotion for his business, since the trial was being televised. In rebuttal, the defense counsel argued that since results of working out were not entirely positive, the witness was not motivated by the public advertising for his company. Judge Nelson sustained the defense's objection.

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